Conference

Crafts: What is Critical?

3 Nov - 4 Nov 2017

The Hostry, Norwich Cathedral, Norwich NR1 4DH

The conference will explore traditional and contemporary approaches to textile craft, considering the emerging dichotomy between handmade and machine/digital interventions in craft, asking the question: 'What is critical for textile craft in the 21st century?'

We are also hoping to see behind the scenes at Norwich Museum store.

Confirmed speakers this year include:

Linda Brassington, artist, researcher and sessional lecturer, University for the Creative Arts, Farnham.

Professor Alison Welsh, Head of the Department of Apparel, Manchester Metropolitan University.

Dr Eiluned Edwards, Reader in Global Cultures of Textiles and Dress, Nottingham Trent University.

Dr Liz Gaston Senior Teaching Fellow, University of Leeds.

Delegate Fees:

Textile Society members £50
Non-members £75
Textile Society student members £20

BOOK YOUR PLACE using the Eventbrite link below or download the booking form (link top right).

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/textile-society-agm-conference-2017-craft-what-is-critical-tickets-37146250435

SCHEDULE

Friday 3 November
1.00 pm
Textile Collections visit: Norfolk Museums Norwich Castle Study Centre, Shire Hall, Market Avenue, Norwich, NR1 3JQ. Meet at the reception desk.

3.00 pm
Textile Society AGM
The Courtroom, Norfolk Museums Norwich Castle Study Centre, Shire Hall, Market Avenue, Norwich, NR1 3JQ. Meet at the reception desk.

6.30 pm
Viewing of the South Asian Decorative Arts and Craft Collection (SADACC) with evening lecture: The SADACC Trust

The Old Skating Rink Gallery 34 - 36 Bethel St, Norwich, NR2 1NR. Meet in the building.

8.00 pm
Evening Dinner at LochFyne Restaurant
30-32B St Giles Street, Norwich, NR2 1LL

Saturday 4 November
9.45 am - 5.00 pm
Textile Society Conference – Craft – What is Critical?

9.45 - 10.25 am
Registration, tea/coffee

10.30 am
Conference starts, includes lunch and refreshments

The 2017 conference will explore traditional and contemporary approaches to textile craft, considering the emerging dichotomy between handmade and machine/digital interventions in craft, and asking the question: what is critical for textile craft in the 21st century?

Are we losing or building traditional textile craft skills? How are we interacting with cultures of making in other countries? How are we integrating traditional and newer methods of textile craft and theorising our ideas? And what can legitimately be described as ‘textile craft’ in the 21st century?

SPEAKERS

Linda Brassington, artist, researcher and sessional lecturer, University for the Creative Arts, Farnham.

Linda is an artist who explores textiles as a surface for drawing and print. Each piece is a response to changing materials, density and texture informed by mark making and photography to create layers of densely pigmented and printed textile surfaces. Her work has been exhibited in Slovakia, Poland, China, USA, Canada, Ukraine and the UK.

Linda's most recent exhibition in Japan will form the basis of her presentation as a case study of contemporary textile craft exploration involving indigo dyeing.


Professor Alison Welsh, Head of the Department of Apparel, Manchester Metropolitan University.

Alison is a designer and textile artist whose recent project 'Field to Fashion' explores the design and construction of traditional garments in India's most prolific textile region, Gujarat. In conjunction with Khamir, a Gujarat-based NGO that develops the craft heritage of Kutch, the project explores the possibility of creating a niche for organic, sustainable Kala cotton through collaboration with local weavers, using contemporary design to help protect traditional crafts skills.

Alison has exhibited in India, China, Japan, Belgium and the UK. Her recent work combining contemporary British Fashion with traditional Indian garments has been shown at textile sustainability events such as 'Fashion as a Force for Good' (2016).


Dr Eiluned Edwards, Reader in Global Cultures of Textiles and Dress, Nottingham Trent University.

Eiluned is an author and researcher on design history and material culture, focusing on craft development and cultural heritage. She is currently collaborating on the development of the South Asian Galleries at the Whitworth Art Gallery in Manchester and the UK-India Year of Culture Project; and the development of the Islamic Art Galleries at the British Museum. She is also collaborating on the development of the Chintz exhibition at the Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto, for 2020. Eiluned has worked with the Craft Revival Trust, New Delhi, and Printers Associations across India.

Eiluned's most recent publications include 'Aneeth Arora: Crafting Fashion' in Selvedge magazine, 'Sustaining Cultural Heritage? The case of contemporary Indian blocks prints' in the journal of Asian Textiles, and 'Printing and Dyeing in India' in the Encyclopaedia of the History of Science, technology and Medicine in Non-Western Cultures.


Dr Liz Gaston Senior Teaching Fellow, University of Leeds.
Liz is a designer and lecturer specialising in knitted fabric and garment design. Her research explores pattern perception and the relationship between craft and public art. Recent UK exhibitions include 'Crafted Futures' as part of Yorkshire's Year of the Textile (2016), creating contemporary textile pieces in response to archive pattern books; and 'Colonise: Responsive Knitted Environments' with Dr Jane Scott, locating knitted textile installations in commercial environments to engage with the dynamics of the space.